My eight favourite blog posts of 2018

It’s always fun to pause, as we near the end of a calendar year, and look back over what has been achieved. I was delighted to realise last week that I could proudly say that, in 2018, I have taught hundreds of people at live events and through online courses, reached thousands of people through my books and sent out tens of thousands of pieces of useful information out via our Birth Information Update.

When one blogs twice a week, it’s easy to forget what came before, and I know that many people are too busy to read everything we put out at the time, so I decided this week to write a blog post sharing some of my favourite blog posts from the year.

Let’s start with this one; one of the most shared blog posts of the year in which I discussed Research showing that “evidence is lacking” to induce labour before 42 weeks of pregnancy.

The one of which I’m most proud? That would be a tie between two of the posts that announced the updating of my books this year. We have Why birth-related decision making is trickier than ever (which relates to What’s Right For Me?) and Ten things I wish every woman knew about induction of labour: the article, which I updated in time for the launch of the updated version of Inducing Labour: making informed decisions.

Another popular post discussing research was Expert midwives and perineal care during birth, my favourite rant was almost certainly Unexpected home birth: let’s keep our shoelaces on, and the two ‘revisiting’ articles which were discussed most among friends and colleagues on social media were The Rhombus of Michaelis and What’s true pussycat?

More recently I shared Seven useful words for the birth room, which was something that I have discussed for years but hadn’t put in writing until this year.

Next week, I’m going to share my annual reminder about self-care. May I, as a prelude to that, invite you to consider everything that you’ve achieved this year and ponder what you’re proud of?

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