Tag: microbiome

Question holding…

“The baby comes from the womb relatively germ-free, and yet within one hour, scientists say the human baby has been colonized with millions of microbes. The question is, whose microbes? One person should be doing this “seeding”, and it is…

A small ‘seeding’ rant

May I jump into the microbiome/seeding debate really briefly, while acknowledging that the issues are much larger and more complex than I have room to discuss in one blog post? Because I have been watching several recent conversations in medical…

Incorporating bacteria into childbirth education

The past couple of years have seen more germ-related research, thinking and discussion than ever, and there is a noteable swing away from the one-sided view that germs are ‘bad’ things to be avoided and washed away with antibacterial soap…

Rethinking bugs (part 2)

Last month, I wrote about my observation that bacteria seem to be ‘trending’ at the moment, and explained my hope that their current popularity might have a part to play in improving care for women and babies. In that article,…

Rethinking Bugs (part 1)

You know those glossy pages in the Sunday paper supplements that tell you what’s going up and down in terms of style?  Well every time I open them I am more and more surprised not to see bacteria featuring in…

Manipulation or understanding?

A mini-rant today, after I spotted the following abstract … the highlighting is mine: “Despite the great advances in modern medicine, our understanding of the most basic function of our complete genetic makeup is extremely poor. Our complete genetic make…

Mode of birth and feeding matter for bugs!

A group of Swedish researchers have carried out a study (which is freely available online, thank you authors) to find out how babies’ guts are colonized with microbes, and their findings make for fascinating reading. The researchers began from the…

Quote of the Month – May 2015

“To study neonatal Streptococcal B infection is to enter the realm of mysteries… How to explain that microbes from maternal origin may be pathogenic for the baby? Several decades ago, we learned that, compared with the placenta of other mammals,…